LOPERs General Studies Program

LOPERs General Studies Program

Hours: 30-31

Students must take a minimum of 30 hours General Studies coursework. Students must take coursework that satisfies LOPERs 1 – 10 (LOPER 11 optional). Minimum of 3 hours must be taken in each LOPER 1 – 8.

Learning Objectives/Program Essential Requirements (LOPERs)

Program-level Learning Outcomes:

  1. To develop core academic skills in collecting and using information, communications in speech and writing, and quantitative reasoning

 

LOPERs 1 - 4

  1. To acquire broad knowledge in a variety of disciplines across the arts, humanities, social and natural sciences

 

LOPERs 5 - 8

  1. To instill dispositions that prepare students to lead responsible and productive lives in a democratic, multicultural society

 

LOPERs 9 - 10, and optionally, LOPER 11

Retroactive Credit

Once courses have gone through the approval process, the General Studies Council could provide General Studies credit retroactively for the 2020/21 Academic Year to minimize the potential minimal impact on students. This will also provide Departments/Programs time to make any necessary changes to their programs published in the undergraduate catalog.

Please notice: Students are allowed to substitute 188-level courses for the First-year Seminar for the 2020-2021 catalog year only. 

 

Other aspects of the General Studies Program

1) Students admitted to UNK with an Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree from a regionally accredited institution will have fulfilled UNK’s GS program requirements. Students are expected to complete GS requirements specified within their program of study.

2) A student may not take more than 3 courses with the same prefix within the General Studies program. Lecture/lab combinations from a single department that are required to be taken concurrently despite being graded as separate courses shall be considered as one unit for this rule.

3) Departments cannot require students to take a specific First-year Seminar (LOPER 1).

4) Departments are encouraged to submit for approval upper-level courses as well as introductory-level courses that meet the GS program learning objectives/program essential requirements.

5) Departments may require up to 7 additional hours for the students majoring in their programs. A department may specify the additional preparatory coursework. These requirements will appear as a separate category from the General Studies Program in the catalog and student’s degree audit as “Program-Specified Requirements”.

LOPER 1

FOUNDATIONAL REQUIREMENTS – Skills that every university-educated person needs:

 First-year seminar* (minimum 3 hours). Courses must meet all learning outcomes.

Assessed as:

  1. Can locate and select appropriate sources of information (to include information important to academic and professional success)
  2. Can discern a source’s argument or purpose and audience
  3. Can summarize a source’s main points accurately and fairly
  4. Can evaluate and use sources appropriately and responsibly
  5. Can integrate information from multiple sources and contrasting viewpoints

 

* The first-year seminar is waived for students admitted as transfer students with a minimum of 18 hours of GS coursework; transfer students and re-admit students still must fulfill the requirements of a minimum of 30 hours GS coursework that meets LOPERs 2-10.

LOPER 2

FOUNDATIONAL REQUIREMENTS – Skills that every university-educated person needs:

Writing skills (ENG 101 minimum; minimum 3 hours). Courses must meet all learning outcomes.

Assessed as:

  1. Can discern a writer’s argument or purpose
  2. Can evaluate and use sources appropriately and responsibly
  3. Can use context-appropriate conventions in writing
  4. Can communicate in a manner appropriate to audience and context

 

Courses

ENG 101: Introduction to Academic Writing (3 credit hours)

ENG 102: Academic Writing and Research (3 credit hours)

LOPER 3

FOUNDATIONAL REQUIREMENTS – Skills that every university-educated person needs:

Oral communication skills (minimum 3 hours). Courses must meet all learning outcomes.

Assessed as:

  1. Can discern a speaker’s argument or purpose
  2. Can evaluate and use sources appropriately and responsibly
  3. Can use context-appropriate conventions in speech and non-verbal expressions
  4. Can form and support a coherent position
  5. Can communicate in a manner appropriate to audience and context

 

Course

SPCH 100: Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3 credit hours)

LOPER 4

FOUNDATIONAL REQUIREMENTS – Skills that every university-educated person needs:

Mathematics, Statistics, and Quantitative Reasoning (minimum 3 hours). Courses must meet all learning outcomes.

Assessed as:

  1. Can describe problems using mathematical, statistical, or programming language
  2. Can solve problems using mathematical, statistical, or programming techniques
  3. Can construct logical arguments using mathematical, statistical, or programming concepts
  4. Can interpret and express numerical data or graphical information using mathematical, statistical, or programming concepts and methods

  

Courses

MATH 102: College Algebra (3 credit hours)

MATH 103: Plane Trigonometry (3 credit hours)

MATH 106: Mathematics for Liberal Arts (3 credit hours)

MATH 120: Finite Mathematics (3 credit hours)

MATH 123: Applied Calculus I (3 credit hours)

MATH 230: Math for Elementary Teachers I (3 credit hours)

MATH 330: Math for Elementary Teachers II (3 credit hours)

STAT 235: Introduction to Statistics for Social Sciences (3 credit hours)

STAT 241: Elementary Statistics (3 credit hours) 

CYBR 101: Computer Science I: Python for Analytics (4 credit hours)

CYBR 102: Computer Science I: C for Security (3 credit hours)

CYBR 103: Computer Science I: Java for Software Development (4 credit hours)

CYBR 306: Introduction to Predictive Modeling (3 credit hours) 

MGT 233: Business Statistic (3 credit hours) 

PSY 250: Behavioral Statistics (3 credit hours)

LOPER 5

BROAD KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS – Every university-educated person should be able to:

Evaluate and/or create cultural products in a discipline of the visual or performing arts (minimum 3 hours). Courses must meet all learning outcomes.

Assessed as:

  1. Can interpret a work of art within its cultural or historical context
  2. Can characterize and evaluate a work of art using concepts appropriate to its medium
  3. Can distinguish between works of art from various schools, time periods, and/or cultures
  4. Can articulate the significance of the arts for themselves or for society

 

Courses

ART 100: Art Structure (3 credit hours)

ART 120: Art Appreciation (3 credit hours)

DANC 122: Dance Appreciation (3 credit hours)

MUS 100: Music Appreciation (3 credit hours)

MUS 101: American Musical Theatre (3 credit hours)

MUS 106: Introduction to Jazz and Blues (3 credit hours)

MUS 107: Introduction to Rock and Blues (3 credit hours)

MUS 347: Music History and Literature I (3 credit hours)

MUS 348: Music History and Literature II (3 credit hours)

THEA 120: Introduction to the Theatre (3 credit hours)

THEA 121: Completing the Look: The Art of Costuming (3 credit hours)

LOPER 6

BROAD KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS – Every university-educated person should be able to:

Explain and evaluate ideas and/or social and cultural conditions using the concepts and methods in a humanities discipline (minimum 3 hours). Courses must meet all learning outcomes.

Assessed as:

  1. Can analyze primary sources appropriate to the humanities discipline
  2. Can compare and contrast theories, narratives, or social/cultural conditions
  3. Can make and support an argument about the human experience
  4. Can articulate the significance of the humanities for themselves or for society

ENG 235H: American Studies (3 credit hours)

ENG 240H: Literary Classics of the Western World (3 credit hours)

ENG 250: Introduction to Literature: British Literature (3 credit hours)

ENG 251: Introduction to Literature: American Literature (3 credit hours)

ENG 252: Introduction to Literature: Western Civilization (3 credit hours)

ENG 253: Intro to Literature: Non-Western Civilization (3 credit hours)

ENG 254: Introduction to Literature: Special Topics (3 credit hours)

ENG 280H: Special Topics (3 credit hours)

FREN 200: Intermediate French I (3 credit hours)

FREN 201: Intermediate French II (3 credit hours)

GERM 200: Intermediate German I (3 credit hours)

GERM 201: Intermediate German II (3 credit hours)

GERM 205: Culture, Conversation and Composition (3 credit hours)

SPAN 200: Intermediate Spanish I (3 credit hours)

SPAN 201: Intermediate Spanish II (3 credit hours)

SPAN 205: Culture, Conversation and Composition (3 credit hours)

HIST 110: History of Science & Medicine (3 credit hours)

HIST 112: History of Religions in the World (3 credit hours)

HIST 210: Western Civilization (3 credit hours)

HIST 211: Western Civilization (3 credit hours)

HIST 212: Non-Western World History (3 credit hours)

HIST 215: Introduction to Latin America (3 credit hours)

HIST 250: American History (3 credit hours)

HIST 251: American History (3 credit hours)

PHIL 100: Introduction to Philosophy (3 credit hours)

PHIL 120: Introduction to Ethics (3 credit hours)

PHIL 250: Ancient Philosophy (3 credit hours)

PHIL 251: Medieval Philosophy (3 credit hours)

PHIL 253: Modern Philosophy (3 credit hours)

PHIL 254: Contemporary Philosophy (3 credit hours)

LOPER 7

BROAD KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS – Every university-educated person should be able to:

Explain and evaluate human behavior and/or social systems using the concepts and methods in a social science discipline (minimum 3 hours). Courses must meet all learning outcomes.

Assessed as:

  1. Can use the discipline’s concepts and methods to explain human behavior and/or social systems
  2. Can investigate problems and analyze evidence using the discipline’s concepts and methods
  3. Can make and support an argument about human behavior or social systems using social-scientific evidence
  4. Can articulate the significance of social scientific knowledge for themselves or for society

 

Courses

CJUS 101: Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credit hours)

CJUS 375: Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (3 credit hours)

CJUS 380: Minorities and Criminal Justice (3 credit hours)

ECON 100: Contemporary Economic Issues (3 credit hours)

ECON 270: Principles of Economics, Macroeconomics (3 credit hours)

ECON 271: Principles of Economics, Microeconomics (3 credit hours) 

GEOG 104: World Regional Geography (3 credit hours)

GEOG 106: Human Geography (3 credit hours)

GEOG 206: Geography of the United States and Canada (3 credit hours) 

PSCI 110: Introduction to American Politics (3 credit hours)

PSCI 168: Introduction to International Relations (3 credit hours)

PSCI 280H: Special Topics (3 credit hours)

PSY 203: General Psychology (3 credit hours)

PSY 230: Human Development (3 credit hours)

SOC 100: Introduction to Sociology (3 credit hours)

SOC 250: Anthropology (3 credit hours)

LOPER 8

BROAD KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS – Every university-educated person should be able to:

Solve problems and evaluate conclusions using the concepts and methods in a natural science discipline (minimum 3 hours). Courses must meet all learning outcomes.

Assessed as:

  1. Can use the discipline’s concepts and methods to explain natural or physical phenomena
  2. Can investigate problems and analyze evidence using appropriate scientific methodology
  3. Can make and support an argument based on sound scientific principles
  4. Can articulate the significance of scientific knowledge for themselves or for society

 

**Natural science requirement may include a lab component (total hours 3 – 4)

Courses 

BIOL 103: General Biology (4 credit hours)

BIOL 105: Biology I (4 credit hours)

BIOL 106: Biology II (4 credit hours)

BIOL 211: Human Microbiology (4 credit hours)

BIOL 215: Human Physiology (4 credit hours) 

CHEM 101: Chemistry & Current Events (4 credit hours)

CHEM 145: Introductory Chemistry (4 credit hours)

CHEM 150: Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry (4 credit hours)

CHEM 160 /160L: General Chemistry/Laboratory (4 credit hours)

CHEM 161 / 161L: General Chemistry/Laboratory (4 credit hours)

GEOG 101: Physical Geography I: The Atmosphere (4 credit hours)

GEOG 102: Physical Geography II: The Lithosphere (4 credit hours)

GEOG 103: The Dynamic Planet: Hazards in the Environment (3 credit hours)

GEOG 209: Meteorology (3 credit hours)

PHYS 100 / 100L: Physical Science/Laboratory (4 credit hours)

PHYS 107: Physical Science for Elementary Teachers (4 credit hours)

PHYS 131H: Newton's Universe (4 credit hours)

PHYS 155 / 155L: Science of Sound and Music/Laboratory (4 credit hours)

PHYS 201: Earth Science (4 credit hours)

PHYS 205 / 205L: General Physics I/Laboratory (5 credit hours)

PHYS 206 / 206L: General Physics II/Laboratory (5 credit hours)

PHYS 209: Meteorology (3 credit hours)

PHYS 210 / 210L: Astronomy/Laboratory (4 credit hours)

PHYS 211: Planetary Astronomy (3 credit hours)

PHYS 275 / 275L: General Physics I (Calculus)/Laboratory (5 credit hours)

PHYS 276 / 276L: General Physics II (Calculus)/Laboratory (5 credit hours)

LOPER 9

DISPOSITIONAL REQUIREMENTS – Every university-educated person should have:

Civic competency and engagement (Civic competency encompasses civic knowledge; analytical skills; and participatory and involvement skills. Civic engagement encompasses motivations, attitudes, and efficacy; democratic norms and values; and participation and activities.) Courses must meet all learning outcomes.

Assessed as:

  1. Can identify issues of public or community concern and problems or challenges posed by lack of civic competency and engagement.
  2. Can gather and evaluate sufficient and reliable information about issues of public concern and have the knowledge and skills to make reasonable judgements and decisions about them
  3. Can evaluate practices and decisions for their civic consequences
  4. Can articulate the importance of community service and civic engagement to address issues of public or community concern

 

Courses

CJUS 102: Crime, Democracy and Justice (3 credit hours)

GEOG 323: Political Geography (3 credit hours)

HIST 176: Democratic Debates (3 credit hours)

PHIL 105: Philosophical Roots of American Democracy (3 credit hours)

PSCI 140: Democracies Around the World (3 credit hours)

SOC 210: Participating in a Democratic Society (3 credit hours)

LOPER 10

DISPOSITIONAL REQUIREMENTS – Every university-educated person should have:

Respect for human diversity (in our own communities and/or globally). Courses must meet all learning outcomes.

Assessed as:

  1. Can describe the nature and consequences of human diversity
  2. Can gather and evaluate information important for relating to diverse populations
  3. Can evaluate practices and decisions for their impacts on inequality or inclusivity
  4. Can articulate the significance of human diversity for themselves or for society

 

*** Designated courses with the appropriate content may be approved to satisfy one of the Broad Knowledge requirements plus LOPER 9 or Broad Knowledge plus LOPER 10. Courses may be approved to satisfy LOPER 9 or LOPER 10 alone. (Courses satisfying LOPER 9 or LOPER 10 alone must be 3 credit hours.)

 

Courses

ETHS 101: Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3 credit hours)

INTS 200: Introduction to International Studies (3 credit hours)

WSTD 220: Women's & Gender Studies (3 credit hours)

LOPER 11

DISPOSITIONAL REQUIREMENTS – Every university-educated person should have:

Wellness (2 – 3 hours; optional (GS Elective); may be required by programs). Courses must meet all learning outcomes.

Assessed as:

  1. Can articulate the importance of the eight domains of wellness (emotional, spiritual, intellectual, physical, environmental, financial, occupational, and social wellness).
  2. Can describe the impact of social factors, and personal decisions and behaviors, on wellness.
  3. Can gather and evaluate information about wellness and apply to personal behavior choices or decisions.
  4. Can integrate information from multiple sources and contrasting viewpoints to make an informed and educated decision regarding wellness.

Courses

FIN 160: Personal Money Management (3 credit hours)

HSCI 140: Introduction to Public Health (3 credit hours)

PE 108: Introduction to Nutrition (3 credit hours)

PE 150: Healthy Wealthy and Wise (3 credit hours)

PSY 231: Abnormal Behavior and Society (3 credit hours)