Emergency Procedures

Active Shooter

Upon the first sighting or sounds of shots fired, you must assess your surroundings and determine your best response.

If shots are heard away from your location and you have a safe way to exit (in the opposite direction of the shots and the shooter) get out. Once out immediately call 911 and give detailed information about the situation.

If it is not safe or the only exit is toward the shots and the shooter, immediately secure your area. Here's what you should do:

    • Lock and barricade doors
    • Turn off lights
    • Close blinds
    • Block window
    • Turn off or silence anything that makes noise
    • Keep occupants calm, quiet and out of sight
    • Keep yourself out of sight and take adequate cover/protection i.e. concrete walls, heavy desks, filing cabinet
    • Silence cell phones
    • If safe to do so, as quietly as possible have someone call 911. Give detailed information about the situation.
    • Stay alert and adjust your plan as the situation change

Un-securing an area

    • Do not un-secure the room you are in until law enforcement instructs you to do so
    • Remember, the shooter will typically not stop until they are engaged by an outside force or run out of ammunition
    • Attempt to rescue people only if it can be accomplished without further endangering the persons inside your secured area

What to report

    • Your specific location, building name and office room/number
    • What is happening
    • Assailant(s) location, number of suspects, identifying characteristics, type of weapons, shooters identity if known, backpack, separate explosions from gun fire.
    • Number of people at your specific location
    • Injuries - number injured and types of injuries

What to expect when law enforcement arrive

    • Remain calm and follow the officers' instructions
    • Immediately raise your hands and spread your fingers, keep hands visible at all times
    • Avoid making quick movements towards officers
    • Avoid pointing, screaming and/or yelling
    • Do not stop to ask officers for help or directions when evacuation, just proceed in the direction from which the officers are entering the premises
    • Keep in mind, law enforcement's immediate objective is to find the threat. They will not tend to the injured on their way into the building.

Program UNKPD's phone number (308-865-8911) into your cell phone for emergency use

Bomb

If you receive a threat via phone, e-mail, mail, or voicemail, take these immediate actions:

By phone
  • Remain calm and stay on the phone as long as possible. Listen and do not interrupt
  • If the telephone has a caller identification, note the phone number
  • Note the date and time you received the call and when the call ended
  • Write down the exact words of the threat
  • Ask the caller:
    • Where is the bomb located?
    • When will the bomb explode?
  • If at any time you perceive you are in immediate danger leave the building at once pulling the fire alarm as you leave. Call 911 when you have reached a safe area.
  • If you feel you are not in danger, have another person call UNK Police to relay information and continue to ask the caller:
    • What does it look like?
    • What kind of bomb is it?
    • What will cause it to explode?
    • Why did you place the bomb?
    • Who is this?
    • Where are you calling from?
  • As you are talking to the caller try to determine:
    • Gender of caller
    • Age of caller
    • Caller’s voice description or attributes
    • Background sounds
  • When the caller hangs up, dial *57 to activate a trace and follow the prompts
  • If not already contacted, call UNK Police at 308-865-8911
  • UNK Police will give the order to evacuate the building if necessary
By mail or e-mail
  • Do not handle the object
  • Do not delete the e-mail
  • Contact UNK Police at 308-865-8911. Give them your name, location, nature of the emergency and other information requested.

Print and keep this bomb threat checklist by your phone If you receive a threat and immediate actions is needed

Class Closings

In the event of severe weather, the Vice Chancellor for Business & Finance will contact the Directors of the Police Department and Facilities Management to determine conditions and weather information. The information is reviewed and a decision is made by the Chancellor. That decision will be relayed to the news media, placed on the University web site, and sent to Faculty, staff, and students by e-mail, phone, and text messaging through the UNKAlert system. Every attempt will be made to disseminate information by 6:30am for day class cancellation and 1pm for on-campus night and all off campus classes.

  • If the decision to close the university is made during normal operating hours, the Police Department will notify the campus via e-mail and by using the Emergency Notification System.

If classes are NOT canceled, but an individual travels from a distance to get to campus:

Assess the conditions of the roads you will need to navigate to travel to campus. The Nebraska Department of Roads website has current road conditions. Calculate your personal safety risk and prepare your vehicle and yourself for winter driving. If you determine it is unsafe to travel to campus, contact your supervisor immediately, if you are a UNK employee. Students, follow your professors' preferred method of contact and let him or her know immediately - as early as possible before class is scheduled to begin.

Earthquake

An earthquake is a seismic event in which the earth shakes violently, and may cause permanent ground displacement, landslides, or liquefaction. Earthquakes are unpredictable and may strike without warning. Disruption of communication lines, power lines, sewer and water mains can be expected. Injuries usually result from falling debris. The University of Nebraska Kearney is in a low earthquake hazard zone.

If Inside

  • Stay inside, until the shaking has stopped
  • Drop down onto your hands and knees so the earthquake does not knock you down.
  • Take cover under a table or desk for protection
  • If there is nothing available to provide protection then sit or stand against an inside wall.
  • Cover your head and neck with your arms to protect yourself from falling debris.
  • Stay away from windows, anything glass and items that are not fixed that could fall over on you
  • If you are in bed stay there and cover your head and neck with a pillow. At night, hazards and debris are difficult to see and avoid, attempts to move in the dark result in more injuries than remaining in bed.

If Outside

  • Stay away from tall structures and trees
  • Move away from power lines and street lights
  • Crouch low to the ground and wait for the tremor to stop
  • Keep looking around, remain aware of dangers that may demand you to move.
  • If you are in a moving vehicle, pull to the side of the road as quickly as possible and stay in the vehicle. Avoid stopping near overhead hazards such as trees, buildings, overpasses and utility poles.

After the Tremor

  • Look around. If there is a clear path to safety, leave the building and go to an open space away from damaged areas. Do not use elevators. Open doors carefully watching for falling objects.
  • Call 911 and report the incident
  • Do not use plumbing or electricity until the building has been checked by facilities
  • Do not use matches or lighters in case of gas leaks
  • Be prepared for additional aftershocks.
  • If you are trapped, do not move about or kick up dust, tap on a pipe or wall or use a whistle, if you have one, so that rescuers can locate you

Evacuation

The University has building specific evacuation plans and emergency personnel identified in each building to ensure the orderly and complete evacuation of each building.

Before an evacuation

  • Read and know your building evacuation plan
  • Identify at least two evacuation routes from the building or space where you spend time
  • Practice evacuating using both routes

During an evacuation

If the fire alarms activate, you see or smell smoke or flames or you are notified by a university official of a building evacuation it is the responsibility of all building occupants to evacuate immediately. Faculty are responsible for directing students to leave the building by the nearest exit and report to the designated assembly area.

  • Do not panic or ignore the alarm
  • Pull the nearest fire alarm pull station if the alarm is not activated
  • Leave the building immediately, in an orderly fashion. Close doors behind you
  • Do not go back to your office, classroom or residence for personal belongings
  • Do not use the elevators
  • Follow the quickest evacuation route from where you are
  • If the quickest route is blocked go to an alternative exit
  • If all exits are blocked, go to a room with an outside window as far away from the danger as possible
    • Close the door and seal cracks around it
    • Open the window and hang an object out of it to draw attention and shout of help
    • Call 911
  • Proceed to the designated emergency assembly point
    • Each building has established assembly points and alternative assembly points to evacuate to during and emergency
    • Building occupants will be directed to these sites by university emergency evacuation personnel
  • If the designated assembly point/area is unsafe or blocked due to the emergency, proceed to the alternate assembly point
  • Report to you Work Are Rep or Instructor at the assembly point to be accounted for;
    • Employees and students should report the location, if known of any occupants that remain in the building or any knowledge they have of missing or trapped persons
  • Return to the building only after emergency officials or building monitors give the all-clear signal. Silencing the alarm does not mean the emergency is over

Evacuation Instructions for Persons Needing Assistance

Supervisory personnel and course instructors are responsible for identifying and escorting individuals with disabilities located in their offices/classrooms to safety if possible. If they are not able to evacuate the individual they need to, at a minimum, get them to a stairwell and then notify rescue personnel.

Any person unable or who needs assistance to evacuate should:

  • Proceed to the nearest stairwell (area of refuge). Emergency evacuation personnel will inform emergency response and rescue personnel if someone has taken refuge there
  • If the stairwell is not a safe area of refuge, go to a room with an outside window as far away from the danger as possible
    • Close the door and seal cracks around it
    • Open the window and hang an object out of it to draw attention and shout of help
  • Inform or ask someone, a building occupant or a floor monitor in particular, to alert the first arriving emergency responders of your presence and location
  • Call 911 and provide the operator with your exact location, building name, floor and room number to ensure rescue personnel are notified of your location and your need for assistance to evacuate

Click to view the Building Evacuation Plan

Click to view the Campus Evacuation Plan

Fire

Before a fire

  • Read and know your building evacuation plan
  • Locate the nearest fire alarm manual pull station
  • Identify at least two evacuation routes from the building or space where you spend time
  • Practice evacuating using both routes

Fire Safety Equipment

  • To ensure fire equipment is in operating condition report any usage to Facilities at 308-865-8533
  • Do not obstruct exits or exit access
  • Do not obstruct exit signs and report signs that will not properly illuminated 
  • Fire doors shall be maintained in the closed position at all times, unless arranged to close automatically in the event of a fire
  • Exits and exit access doors shall not be locked at any time unless equipped with panic hardware or other approved means to permit emergency egress by building occupants
  • Smoking is not allowed in university buildings
  • Candles are prohibited
  • Do not overload electrical cords and if they are worn, frayed or feel warm replace them

During a fire

If the fire alarms activate, you see or smell smoke or flames or you are notified by a university official of a building evacuation it is the responsibility of all building occupants to evacuate immediately. Faculty are responsible for directing students to leave the building by the nearest exit and report to the designated assembly area. 

  • Do not panic or ignore the alarm
  • Pull the nearest fire alarm pull station if the alarm is not activated
  • Leave the building immediately, in an orderly fashion. Close doors behind you
  • Do not go back to your office, classroom or residence for personal belongings
  • Do not use the elevators
  • Keep low to the floor if smoke is in your room
  • Before opening a door
    • Feel the door knob. If it is hot, do not open the door
    • If the knob is not hot, brace yourself against the door and open slightly (fire can create pressure strong enough to push a door open if it is not held firmly.) If heat or heavy smoke is present in the corridor, close the door and stay in the room.
  • Follow the quickest evacuation route from where you are
  • If the quickest route is blocked go to an alternative exit
  • If all exits are blocked, go to a room with an outside window as far away from the danger as possible
    • Close the door and seal cracks around it
    • Open the window and hang an object out of it to draw attention and shout of help
    • Call 911
  • Proceed to the designated emergency assembly point
    • Each building has established assembly points and alternative assembly points to evacuate to during and emergency
    • Building occupants will be directed to these sites by university emergency evacuation personnel
  • If the designated assembly point/area is unsafe or blocked due to the emergency, proceed to the alternate assembly point
  • Report to you Work Are Rep or Instructor at the assembly point to be accounted for;
    • Employees and students should report the location, if known of any occupants that remain in the building or any knowledge they have of missing or trapped persons
  • Return to the building only after emergency officials or building monitors give the all-clear signal. Silencing the alarm does not mean the emergency is over

Evacuation Instructions for Persons Needing Assistance

Supervisory personnel and course instructors are responsible for identifying and escorting individuals with disabilities located in their offices/classrooms to safety if possible. If they are not able to evacuate the individual they need to, at a minimum, get them to a stairwell and then notify rescue personnel.

Any person unable or who needs assistance to evacuate should:

  • Proceed to the nearest stairwell (area of refuge). Emergency evacuation personnel will inform emergency response and rescue personnel if someone has taken refuge there
  • If the stairwell is not a safe area of refuge, go to a room with an outside window as far away from the danger as possible
    • Close the door and seal cracks around it
    • Open the window and hang an object out of it to draw attention and shout of help
  • Inform or ask someone, a building occupant or a floor monitor in particular, to alert the first arriving emergency responders of your presence and location
  • Call 911 and provide the operator with your exact location, building name, floor and room number to ensure rescue personnel are notified of your location and your need for assistance to evacuate

Click to view the Building Evacuation Plan

Flooding

The Kearney area is prone to flash-floods during times of excessive rain or large amounts of ice/snow melt. Kearney roads are also prone to small amounts of flooding during heavy rains. Remain aware of the water on the roads - drainage within city limits can be slow and can cause a backup of water leading to hydroplaning if driving is not cautious and careful. 

Notification
  • For floods impacting UNK an announce e-mail will be sent notifying campus
  • In extreme situations
    • A UNKAlert and/or the Voice Over Fire Alarm System will be utilized, if possible
    • During non-business hours UNK Police officers will proceed to as many buildings and classrooms as possible to make notifications
During a Flood
  • Get to higher ground
  • Be aware of areas that tend to flood easily. Stay out of these areas
  • If at all possible, DO NOT travel
    • If it is necessary to travel DO NOT walk through moving water. It only takes six inches of moving water to knock you off your feet. If you are trapped by moving water, move to the highest possible point and call 911
    • Do not drive into flooded roadways or around barricades. Water may be deeper than it appears and can hide many hazards. A vehicle caught in swiftly moving waters can be swept away in a matter of seconds. Twelve inches of water can float a car or small SUV and 18 inches of water can carry away a large vehicle
    • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Be sure to lock your home as you leave. If you have time disconnect utilities and appliances
    • Listen to local radio and television stations or weather alert systems for updates
After a Flood
  • Avoid flood waters as they may be contaminated with gas, biohazards, oil or sewage
  • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Roads may have weakened and could collapse
  • Stay away from downed power lines and electrical wires. Do not drive over these lines either
  • Do not return to flooded areas until emergency personnel indicate it is safe to do so
  • Stay out of the buildings if flood waters remain around the building
  • Be alert and report any hazard
Water Damage
  • Do not enter wet areas because of the danger of electrocution. If there is any possible danger, leave the area and call HVAC at 308-627-6044
  • If there is no danger, call Facilities at 308-865-1800 or 308-627-6044 and advise them of the problem, including the location, the severity and whether any valuables are involved or threatened
  • If you know the source of the water and are confident in your ability to stop it do so cautiously
  • Be prepared to assist, if directed to do so, in protected University and personal property that is in jeopardy. Take only those steps that are needed to avoid or reduce immediate water damage

Hazardous Materials

In the event of a chemical spill, prompt and proper clean-up is essential. The following are general guidelines to be followed for a chemical spill.

Before
  • Using a safety data sheet or other reliable data sources, become familiar with and regularly review the hazards of the materials you work with. Review should include associated health and safety risks, the use of personal protection equipment, and cleanup and disposal procedures
  • If in doubt about any characteristic of the material, contact Environmental Health and Safety at 308-627-5355
  • Have the proper cleanup materials on hand
During
  • Notify first responders
    • In an emergency call 911
    • In a non-emergency call Environmental Health and Safety at 308-627-5355 and UNK Police at 308-865-8911
  • Secure the area
    • If safe to do so, isolate the spill
    • Leave the contaminated area and notify others who may be impacted. If dangerous to building occupants pull the fire alarm to initiate an evacuation
    • Avoid inhaling gases, vapors, and/or smoke
    • Do not walk through or touch contaminated surfaces
    • If the material is identified locate its MSDS. Give a copy to first responders and have victims take a copy to their medical provider
  • First aid
    • Assist others only if it is safe to do so and only up to your trained ability
    • Wear personal protective equipment appropriate for the hazard
    • Avoid touching contaminated skin and/or clothing
    • Remove contaminated clothing and contain it in a plastic bag
    • If hazardous materials came in contact with skin or eyes, immediately flush the affected area with large amounts of water
    • If infectious materials (blood, body fluids, anthrax) come in contact with your skin, immediately wash the affected area with soap and water
If you are sheltering due to a hazardous materials or harmful contaminants
  • Close and lock all windows, exterior doors and any other opening to the outside
  • Close window shades, blinds or curtains
  • If possible seal gaps around doors and windows
  • Select an interior room above the ground floor, with the fewest windows or vents. Avoid overcrowding and avoid rooms with mechanical equipment
  • Close the interior door to the room you are sheltering in
  • Have a room with a landline phone available in case cell phones fail
  • Anyone showing obvious symptoms of exposure to a contaminant must be separated from others. They should wash/shower with soap and water and place contaminated clothing in a sealed bag if possible


Intense Heat

In recent years, excessive heat has caused more deaths than all other weather events, including floods. A heat wave is a prolonged period of excessive heat, often combined with excessive humidity. Generally temperatures are 10 degrees or more above the average high temperature for the region during summer months, last for a long period of time and occur with high humidity as well.

Are you Red Cross Ready for a heat wave? Find out!

Know the Difference:

Excessive Heat Watch—Conditions are favorable for an excessive heat event to meet or exceed local Excessive Heat Warning criteria in the next 24 to 72 hours.

Excessive Heat Warning—Heat Index values are forecast to meet or exceed locally defined warning criteria for at least 2 days (daytime highs=105-110° Fahrenheit).

Heat Advisory—Heat Index values are forecast to meet locally defined advisory criteria for 1 to 2 days (daytime highs=100-105° Fahrenheit).


Prepare for a Heat Wave...

  • Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes.
  • The heat index is the temperature the body feels when the effects of heat and humidity are combined. Exposure to direct sunlight can increase the heat index by as much as 15° F.
  • If you do not have air conditioning, choose places you could go to for relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day (schools, libraries, theaters, malls)

During a Heat Wave...

  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
  • Eat small meals and eat more often.
  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.
  • Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day.
  • Postpone outdoor games and activities.
  • Take frequent breaks if you must work outdoors.

After a Heat Wave...

  • Move to a cooler place. Remove of loosen tight clothing and apply cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin. Drink small amounts of water slowly.
  • If water is refused, vomiting occurs, or consciousness is lost, call 911 or the local emergency number.

Medical/Pandemic

Before

One of the most important steps in medical emergencies is to be prepared.

  • Have an emergency first aid kit available. Read the first aid manuals that are often included so you know beforehand how to use the contents
  • Become CPR and First Aid trained
  • Identify the locations of the nearest automated external defibrillator (AED)
During
  • Check the surrounding for any safety issues, do nor rush into a situation where you may become a victim
  • Call 911 for further instructions as well as to receive aid and be instructed on how to continue. UNK Police will be dispatched along with other emergency personnel
  • Give them a brief description of the emergency, include names(s) of the victims(s) if known, if they are conscious/unconscious, breathing on their own and the exact location of where they are needed
  • Return to the victim and make them as comfortable as possible. Never move a seriously injured person unless it is a life threatening situation.
  • Render first aid up to your trained ability
  • If possible, have someone meet the emergency personnel at the building entrance

Pandemic


A pandemic is a global disease outbreak. An influenza pandemic occurs when a new influenza virus emerges for which there is little or no immunity in the human population, and the virus begins to cause serious illness, then spreads easily person-to-person worldwide.

If a pandemic occurs, it is expected that it will have world-wide impact with an unpredictable timeline, comprising multiple fast spreading events or waves. Major disruptions are likely for health care, transportation, infrastructure, education, suppliers and other public services. Although physical facilities will not be damaged, human resources will be affected, with high levels of absences from the work site. An informed and prepared public can take appropriate actions to decrease their risk during a pandemic. To be prepared for such an emergency;

  • Create a home emergency plan.
  • Have necessary preparedness items on stock at home (food, water, medicines)
  • Talk with your local public health officials and health care providers, who can supply information about the signs and symptoms of a specific disease outbreak and recommend prevention and control actions.
  • Adopt business/school practices that encourage sick employees/students to stay home.
  • Prioritize job duties to anticipate how to function with a significant decrease in your workforce.
  • Develop guidelines to modify face-to-face contacts.
  • Limit/discontinue travel for university business.
  • Discontinue extracurricular events and large gatherings.
  • Practice good health habits, including eating a balanced diet, exercising daily, and getting sufficient rest. In addition, take common-sense steps to stop the spread of germs, including frequent hand washing, covering coughs and sneezes and staying away from others as much as possible when you are sick.



Influenza Links

Information from UNK on Influenza

For up-to-date influenza information, visit the U.S. Government's page for the Center of Disease Control and Prevention.

Missing Students

UNK has procedures to respond to and assist with reports of missing students. This policy applies to students who reside in campus housing.

For purposes of this policy, a student may be deemed a “missing person” if the University is notified a person is missing for more than 24 hours without any known reason or which is contrary to his/her usual behavioral pattern or within the 24 hour period if there is unusual circumstances.

Procedures for designation of an emergency contact
  • Students will be given the opportunity yearly during the housing registration process to designate an individual or individuals to be contacted by the University no more than 24 hours after the time the student is determined to be missing. This individual will further be updated as to the progress of the investigation. This designated missing student emergency contact will be registered confidentially and is only accessible by authorized campus officials and law enforcement personnel, in the furtherance of the investigation. This designated missing student contact will remain in effect until changed or revoked by the student.
  • If a student decided to complete this form at a time other than housing registration or they need to make updates to this form they may contact Residence Life at 308-865-8519 or at their office in Conrad Hall.
  • Students under the age of 18 who are not emancipated will have their custodial parent or guardian notified no more than 24 hours after the student is determined to be missing in addition to notifying any emergency contacts they have listed.
Procedures for missing students notification
  • Any individual who believes a residential student may be missing must immediately notify either the Office of Residence Life at 308-865-8519, at the office in Conrad Hall, or UNK Police at 308-865-8911.
  • If an individual who lives off campus is believed to be missing, the reporting person will be referred to their local police department.
  • All University departments will work with these agencies to assist them in their investigation.
  • If the above actions are unsuccessful in locating the student or it is apparent immediately that the student is a missing person (e.g., witnessed abduction) the UNK Police will report the missing person to the National Crime Information Center of the Department of Justice and contact the appropriate law enforcement agency to report the student as a missing person and request their assistance as the lead investigating agency on the case.
  • No later than 24 hours after determining that a residential student is missing, the Office of Residence Life will notify the emergency contact for the student. In addition the parent/guardian for student under the age of 18 will be contacted.

UNK Policy on Missing Persons

Natural Gas Leak

Some buildings on campus use natural gas. In addition, underground natural gas lines run across and near campus. Natural gas does not have an odor, so a chemical that smells like rotten eggs is added to the gas. This chemical allows us to smell natural gas at levels well below explosive levels.

If a natural gas smell is noticed:

  • Call Facilities at 308-865-1800 or 308-627-6044, or call UNK Police at 308-865-8911
  • Provide;
    • Your name, location and contact information
    • Location of the odor
    • A description of the nature of the odor (light, moderate, strong, static, increasing, dissipating, etc.)
    • Symptoms, if any, that may be associated with the gas, such as light-headedness, nausea, etc
    • Known or suspected source of the odor

Based on the information provided the appropriate response personnel will be dispatched. These response personnel will also determined if it is necessary to evacuate any portion of a building or campus.

In the event of an evacuation:

  • Once outside, move away from any apparent sources and out of the prevailing winds
  • Assembly at your designated evacuation site unless it is unsafe to do so then gather a safe distance from the building
  • If you have knowledge that may assist in evaluating the source of the leak, meet emergency responders as they arrive on-site
  • Do not return to the building until instructed to by emergency personnel

Power Outages

Summer power outages can be associated with excessively strong winds, tree/debris interference, or other storm damage.

Winter power outages can be associated with excessively heavy snowfall or with ice storms.


Tips for safety during outages:
  • Turn off and unplug all unnecessary electrical equipment, including sensitive electronics.
  • Turn off or disconnect any appliances (like stoves), equipment or electronics you were using when the power went out. When power comes back on, surges or spikes can damage equipment.
  • Leave one light turned on so you’ll know when the power comes back on.
  • Eliminate unnecessary travel, especially by car. Traffic lights will be out and roads will be congested.


For on-campus power outages, contact the Facilities department:

Facilities Service Desk
facilities@unk.edu
308-865-1800

After hours, contact UNK Police at 308-865-8911



Downed Power Line

  • If you happen to encounter a downed power line, stay away. All downed power lines should be treated as if they were still carrying power.
  • If you are in your vehicle and a power line has fallen on it, stay in your vehicle until power company personnel arrive on the scene. If remaining in the car is not an option (fire or other unsafe conditions), jump clear of the vehicle and shuffle away keeping your feet together.

Suspicious Package

In the event a suspicious package, envelope, or object is found

  • Do not touch, taste, or move the object
  • Do not use cell phones or 2-way radios within the area of the suspicious package
  • Leave the room, close the door, and if possible lock the area to prevent others from entering. Warn others on your way out
  • Once away from the package call 911

Train staff members who are in contact with mail to be aware of suspicious signs

  • Excessive postage, no postage, or non-canceled postage
  • No return address or obviously fictitious return address
  • Strange appearance (e.g. excessive tape, tied with string, strange odor, leaks, stains, protruding wires, discoloration, crystallization, or powdery substance on or in the item, rigid, bulky, lopsided or uneven)
  • Handwritten or restrictive notes such as "To be opened in the privacy of", "Confidential", "Your lucky day is here", "Prize enclosed"
  • Hand-delivered or "dropped off for a friend" packages or letters
  • Packages that are unexpected or from someone unfamiliar to you
  • Improper spelling of addressee names, titles or locations
  • Packages that are addressed to someone no longer with your organization or otherwise outdated
  • Unexpected envelopes from foreign countries
  • Letters or packages arriving before or after a suspicious call

Thunderstorm/Lightning

A Severe Thunderstorm Watch means severe thunderstorms are possible in and near the watch area. Stay informed and be ready to act if a severe thunderstorm warning is issued.


A Severe Thunderstorm Warning means severe weather has been reported by spotters or indicated by radar. Warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property.

Before a storm
  • Keep an eye on the sky. Look for darkening skies, flashes of light, or increasing winds. Listen for the sounds of thunder
  • If you can hear thunder, you are close enough to the storm to be struck by lightning
  • Go to a safe shelter immediately "When thunder roars-get indoors"
  • Tune into local media sources for updated information
During a storm
  • Seek shelter immediately in a substantial building. The second safest place is in a vehicle with a metal roof and sides
  • Telephone lines, electrical appliances and metal pipes can conduct electricity. Unplug appliances and avoid using the telephone or any electrical appliances. (However, leaving electric items on does not increase the chances of your home being struck by lightning)
  • Avoid taking a bath, shower, or running water for any purpose
  • Draw blinds and shades over windows. If a window breaks due to the storm, the shades will prevent glass from shattering into your home
  • Tune into local media sources for updated information
If you are caught outside
  • Stay away from water
  • Never stand under a tall isolated tree
  • If you are in the woods, take shelter under the shorter trees
  • If you are boating or swimming, get to land and find shelter immediately
After the storm
  • Do not drive on flooded roadways
  • Do not put yourself at risk by entering storm-damaged areas
  • Stay away from downed power lines
  • Listen to the radio/television for updated information
Outdoor Warning Sirens

Activation of the outdoor warning sirens constitute an emergency situation and individuals need to seek shelter and tune into local media to gather further information. Sirens can be activated for the following reasons;

  • A tornado
  • Straight line winds in excess of 75 mph
  • Damaging hail of 2.5 inches or larger or a large scale
  • Hazardous materials spill.

These sirens are tested on the first Thursday of every month at approximately 5:30 pm.

Tornado

Tornado Watch
  • A watch means tornados could develop
  • If a tornado watch is in effect, a campus wide announce email will be sent during business hours
  • During non-business hours, information is relayed to an afterhours weather group.
  • Listen to local radio and television stations or weather alerts for updates
Tornado Warning
  • A warning means a tornado has been sighted in the general area. If the warning sirens sound, immediately proceed to the designated shelter location(s). Advise others on your way. Do not use the elevators.
  • If time does not permit, get into the safest area of your building, classroom or office
  • Avoid windows, auditoriums, gymnasiums or other structures with free-span roofs, boiler room areas or electrical switchgear areas
  • Shelter may be taken underneath your desk or any heavy furniture available.
  • Building personnel and course instructors are responsible for identifying and escorting to safety individuals who have disabilities or are otherwise physically unable to get to their shelter.
  • The elevators may be used to transport individuals with physical disabilities to shelters, along with their escorts. Visually-impaired and hearing-impaired individuals may be escorted down the stairs to shelters
  • In the event of a power failure, individuals who are unable to use the stairs should move to an interior location without windows and call UNK Police at 308-865-8911 or 911. UNK Police will notify the appropriate emergency personnel with the location.
Outdoors
  • Seek indoor shelter if possible
  • Parked motor vehicles are unsafe. Seek indoor shelter
  • If an indoor shelter is not available and there is not time for escape, lie flat in a nearby ditch or low spot, cover your head with your hands
  • Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You are safer in a low flat location
  • Be aware of the potential for flooding
  • Watch out for flying debris
Outdoor Warning Sirens

Activation of the outdoor warning sirens constitute an emergency situation and individuals need to seek shelter and tune into local media to gather further information. Sirens can be activated for the following reasons;

  • A tornado
  • Straight line winds in excess of 75 mph
  • Damaging hail of 2.5 inches or larger or a large scale
  • Hazardous materials spill.

These sirens are usually tested on the first Thursday of every month at approximately 5:30 pm.

Are you Red Cross Ready for a Tornado?

Winter

Winter in Nebraska can bring snow, ice, subfreezing temperatures and wind that can limit travel and cause power outages. It is important to stay updated on weather conditions and be prepared for possible winter weather emergencies.

Know the Different Winter Weather Warnings

Freezing Rain creates a coating of ice on roads and walkways

Sleet is rain that turns to ice pellets before reaching the ground. Sleet also causes roads to freeze and become slippery

Frost/Freeze warnings mean below freezing temperatures are expected

Winter Storm Outlook means that winter storm conditions are possible in the next 2 to 5 days.

Winter Weather Advisory means that winter weather conditions (cold, ice and snow) are expected to cause significant inconveniences and may be hazardous. 

Winter Storm Watch means severe weather conditions such as heavy snow or ice is possible within the next 24 to 48 hours.

Winter Storm Warning means severe winter conditions have begun or will begin very soon. People should seek shelter and not travel.

Blizzard Warning mean heavy snow and strong winds will produce a blinding snow, near zero visibility, deep drifts and life-threatening wind chill. People should seek shelter and not travel.


Before Winter Weather:

  • Shop ahead –have extra food on hand in case you cannot get out to get supplies or if food services are unable to provide food
  • Do not let medications run low in case you cannot get out to get your prescriptions filled
  • Have a landline phone or know where one is in your building in case cell phones fail

When a Winter Storm Warning is Issued:

  • Stay indoors during the storm
  • If you must go outside, wear several layers of lightweight clothing (several lightweight layers will keep you warmer than a single heavy layer)
  • Wear gloves (mittens) and a hat to prevent body heat loss
  • Cover your mouth to protect your lungs
  • Walk carefully on snowy, icy sidewalks
  • Avoid unnecessary travel. If you must travel,
    • Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive
    • Give plows enough room to operate safely
    • Carry a Disaster Supplies kit
  • Snow can quickly turn to slush on the roads that can be deceiving and still slippery. The same slush can freeze overnight or in cold temperatures, creating icy conditions
  • When freezing rain is in the forecast, be aware and cautious of potential driving conditions
  • If you shovel snow, be extremely careful. It is physically strenuous work, so take frequent breaks. Avoid overexertion.

 

Vehicle Preparation:

  • Keep your gas tank full
  • Ensure your vehicle has an ice scraper, small shovel and road salt canister in it
  • Make sure you and your car are prepared properly
    • Keep a disaster kit in your home as well as an emergency kit for your car which may include:
      • Battery-powered radio and flashlight
      • Extra batteries
      • Blanket
      • Booster/jumper cables
      • Fire extinguisher (5 lb., A-B-C type)
      • First aid kit with manual
      • Bottled water and non-perishable high energy foods (ie: Granola bars, raisins, peanut butter)
      • Maps, shovel, flares
      • Tire repair kit and pump

If you get stuck:

  • Stay with your car. Do not try to walk to safety
  • Tie a brightly colored cloth (preferably red) to the antenna for rescuers to see
  • Start the vehicle and use the heater for about 10 minutes every hour.
  • Keep the exhaust pipe clear so fumes won’t back up in the car
  • Leave the overhead light on when the engine is running so that you can be seen
  • As you sit, keep moving your arms and legs to keep blood circulating and to stay warm

UNK policy on snow removal lots and snow emergency regulations:

There will be NO PARKING allowed in Commuter (yellow) only lots from midnight to 6:00 a.m., November 1 to April 1.

In the event of snow during a time in which parking is allowed, a SNOW EMERGENCY will be declared, at which time there will be NO PARKING in Commuter (yellow), or Employee (blue). Signs may be posted and Residence Halls will be notified if possible. It will be the responsibility of the owner of the vehicle to watch weather conditions and take appropriate steps.

Snow Removal Lots will be enforced during all breaks.

City of Kearney snow emergency regulations:



Nebraska Department of Roads

Red Cross tips on how to prepare for snow