Tickets for the musical

Theatre Tickets for The Orphan Train
(All performances in the Miriam Drake Theatre in the Fine Arts Building)

Public Performances

Wednesday, October 3 7:30 PM
Thursday, October 4 7:30 PM
Saturday, October 6 7:30 PM
Sunday, October 7 2:00 PM


School Matinee Performances

Thursday, October 4 10:00 AM
Friday, October 5 10:00 AM

School matinee performances are open to middle school students. Please contact Susan Deiger for information and reservations @ 308-865-8406.

Ticket Prices for the Orphan Train

Adult: $15.00
Youth (5-18 yrs.): $5.00
UNK Faculty/Staff, Seniors, Non-UNK College Students: $10.00
UNK Student: $3.00 with a valid UNK ID
Student Matinees:

$1.00 (Thursday and Friday mornings only)

UNK Theatre Box Office

UNK Fine Arts Building (around the corner from Java Notes)
2506 12th Ave.
Kearney, NE 68849-3230

Phone: (308) 865-8417
Fax: (308) 865-8806
Email: boxoffice@unk.edu

Information on Box Office schedule and policies:
http://www.unk.edu/academics/theatre/box-office.php

Description of Musical

Orphan Train, The Musical: The Story & Our Message

An original production dramatizing America’s first national experiment in foster care, Orphan Train, The Musical paints the portrait of a social movement begun by visionary 19th-century minister Charles Loring Brace. The Children’s Aid Society, New York Foundling Hospital and other groups rescued nearly 250,000 children from the streets of New York and placed them with adoptive families in the Midwest and West in hopes of achieving a healthier, happier life away from big-city poverty and neglect. The “orphan trains” continued running until 1929, and an estimated 8 million Americans living today are direct descendants of orphan train riders. Our Orphan Train musical drama is designed as a family entertainment, a “living history” event. Audiences of all ages laugh and cry at our story of the kids on the train facing an uncertain future armed only with courage and youthful innocence. Orphan Train is a call to action: we as a society need to address our era’s own “surplus children” — the millions of American youth whose childhood is scarred by poverty, homelessness, gangs and addiction.

Courtesy of Patricia Birch