Additional Resources

This page provides lots of valuable tips and suggestions that will help you before, during, and after your international experience.

Packing Considerations

It's almost impossible for us to provide you with an itemized list including everything you need and how much you need of it. But, we completely understand the anxiety of not knowing what to pack. Check out the resources below to help get an idea about what you need to pack.

Packing Tips:
  • Know the climate of your destination country.
  • Understand what is culturally acceptable attire.
  • Determine how will you be getting places? (walking, public transportation, etc...)
  • Think about the types of activities that you participate in? (hiking, sports, formal events, etc...)
  • Pay attention to your daily activities. Prior to packing, take notes about what items are a must and what items you can live without.
  • Pack light. You don't want to break your back carrying luggage, plus you'll want room in your suitcase to bring home keepsakes.
  • Pack intentionally. A good rule of thumb: If the piece of clothing doesn't make 3+ outfits then you probably don't need it.

Communication Tools

It is important to research and develop a strategy for communicating within your host country and with your friends and family in the U.S. Below are some resources and suggestions that you may find helpful.

A Quick Communication Checklist (The Center for Global Education):
  • I know all the important telephone and fax numbers and addresses for my program's office both in the U.S. and abroad, including emergency after–hours numbers.
  • I know the address and telephone number for my residence abroad.
  • I know how my calling card plan works and how to use my card to call home.
  • I know where to buy a cell phone abroad in case I need one.
  • If I bring my PDA, its wireless service will work abroad.
  • I have created an internationally accessible email account.
  • All of my emergency contacts both in the U.S. and abroad have all of my contact information, and I have theirs.
  • I know how the mail service operates in the country of your choice (efficiency, costs, etc.) and what to expect when mailing items.
  • I have a list of everyone to whom I have given out my contact information.
  • I have asked those to whom I have given my address to tell me before they mail me anything.

Communication Tips:
  • Collect a business card or information sheet that has the address of your university and lodging printed in the host country's language. Usually you can find these at the front desk or visitor center. Doing this will make it easier to get directions and information when using public transportation or seeking help from a local.
  • Discuss your communication pattern with family and friends that you plan to keep in contact with while abroad. Your schedule may be a bit unpredictable, but developing a pattern will allow friends, family, and yourself to maintain a relationship and decrease anxiety. For example, if they expect you to call/email/Skype once a week and you don't call for two weeks because you are busy, they may worry. Discussing communication patterns will help everyone understand each others' communication needs, the best means to communicate, and how to handle emergencies.
  • Consider using social media (Facebook, twitter, blogs, etc..) to keep in touch. These avenues are cost effective in most countries, can keep people connected when time zones and schedules clash, and they allow you to share photos and more descriptive accounts of your journey.

International Flights

Whether your study abroad program requires that you book your flight or not, you can benefit from these resources and suggestions about how to travel financially smart, safe, and healthy.

Legal Systems in Foreign Countries

It is important to research and understand the legal system of your destination county. You are responsible for following the laws of the country, city, university you are visiting.

Measurement Conversion

Getting used to a metric system may be challenging when you are used to thinking in yards, miles, and Fahrenheit. Print this guide and carry it with you, just in case you need some help.

Conversion Guide: U.S. System to Metric

Selecting a Camera

You will likely be keeping a blog of your adventure (including many pictures) and hope to eventually enlarge some of your favorite photos for display. When choosing a camera, please note that using a Higher Resolution Camera will give you an advantage when uploading quality photos that can be viewed by others. It can also ensure that your printing needs are met after you return to the U.S. Our office uses a lot of photos submitted in our photo contests and on blogs for advertising purposes, and after researching the topic with Creative Services we have learned that using photos goes back to the first step of selecting the appropriate camera. Don't forget to do your research and capture the unbelievable experience so that you can remember it forever!

Make the most of your Study Abroad

You are sure to experience growth and develop personally, academically, and professionally throughout your entire study experience. From the moment you say, "YES, I am going to study abroad!" make sure your experience is one to remember. Below are resources that can assist you as you prepare for your experience. If you still have questions, please do not hesitate to contact the Office of Study Abroad.

Information for International Undergraduate Students

You are sure to experience growth and develop personally, academically, and professionally throughout your entire study experience. From the moment you say, "YES, I am going to study abroad!" make sure your experience is one to remember. Below are resources that can assist you as you prepare for your experience. If you still have questions, please do not hesitate to contact the Office of Study Abroad.