Political Science

Dr. Christie Maloyed

Dr. Christie Maloyed

Assistant Professor
Founders Hall , 2246
(308) 865-8724
maloyedcl@unk.edu

B.A., Emory & Henry College
Ph.D., Texas A&M University
Hometown: Saltville, VA
Joined UNK Faculty: 2011

Political Theory 

The study of political theory focuses on how government should work. It combines the rigorous study of history, philosophy, and the social sciences to examine how different political systems have worked in the past and make judgments about the advantages and limitations of those systems. Some of the important questions driving this field include:

  • What does it mean to have a democratic system of government, and are democracies actually better than alternative forms of government?
  • What rights do we have as humans, and what recourse are we justified in taking when governments fail to protect our rights?
  • What is the relationship between economics and political systems? Does capitalism actually make people more free or does is lead to greater inequality?
  • What are the obligations of citizens to each other and to their governments?
  • Does the success of a system of government depend on the particular religious, cultural, and political history of an area?
  • Should some political communities have the right to make choices that are offensive to others (ex: denying particular groups the right to participate in government)?


On working with undergraduate students:
“The most exciting part of my job is helping students learn how to ask the right questions. ‘Question everything’ is my philosophy, from our own closely held assumptions to the authority of the books we read, the news we watch, and even our teachers. By teaching students how to recognize and develop well-defended arguments and critical questions, I hope to prepare them for a lifetime of curiosity and learning. Being engaged citizens starts with having engaged and open minds.”

Favorite quasi-political quote:
"If you would not be forgotten,
As soon as you are dead and rotten,
Either write things worth reading,
or do things worth the writing.”
–Benjamin Franklin

  • “Reverend John Witherspoon’s Pedagogy of Leadership,” Co-authored with J. Kelton Williams, American Educational History Journal, 2012.
  • “A Liberal Civil Religion: William Penn’s Holy Experiment,” Journal of Church and State, 2012.