History

Course Offerings for Fall 2014

HIST 801 America Interpreted

An introductory graduate readings course in American historiography. The class examines the leading schools of historical opinion from the founding of American society through the modern era.

HIST 803 Historical Methods

This course will introduce graduate students to the history profession and to the tools and methods used by historians.

HIST 848-01 Readings in American History: Constitutional History

HIST 848-02 Readings in American History: American West

This graduate readings course provides an overview of the American West from pre-European contact to the twentieth century. Students will become familiar with major historians such as Frederick Jackson Turner, Walter Prescott Webb, Herbert Eugene Bolton, Richard White, and Patricia Limerick. Topics to be covered include traditional western subjects such as exploration and territorial expansion, fur trade, railroads, mining, law and order, and homesteading. This course will also cover works of the New Western Historians who focus on topics such as race and gender, borderlands, urbanization, and the environment. These selections aim at grounding students in a broad thematic and chronologic historiography. The selection of texts will confront students with a variety of topics, adding complexity and multiple perspectives to their understanding of Western history. Third, skills in analysis, writing and debate will be developed through writing assignments and participation in online discussion forums.

HIST 848-03 Readings in American History: Public History Administration

HIST 848-04 Readings in American History: Progressive Era

HIST 848-05 Readings in American History: Great Depression

This online graduate readings course examines major issues surrounding the Great Depression in the United States. Topics and reading span a large cross section of this period. The time covered – from 1929 to 1941 – represents some of the most turbulent years in the country’s history, but also some of the most fruitful We will be reading several of the of the “standard” books about the era, as well as several lesser known accounts. The causes of the Depression will be explored; an attempt will be made to determine what effects this greatest economic collapse in our history had on the lives, thinking, and values of the American people; the roles of such individual leaders as Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt will be discussed, as will the programs and philosophy of the New Deal, political realignment, the rise of a partial welfare state, the relationship between art and politics, the role of the new media of radio and film, and the differing impact of the Depression upon women and men, upon various races and ethnic groups, and upon different social classes. Although this is a course on American culture and society, a brief discussion of the effects of the Depression elsewhere--particularly the rise of Nazism in Germany--will be included. Finally, we shall take a look at the legacy of the Depression--its meaning for American thinking and development in the years since--and make some comparisons of that time with the present.

HIST 848-06 Readings in American History: Native American

This reading course will survey Native American History from time immemorial to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on Native peoples as active agents in creating their own history both before and after Euro-American contact. Topics to be examined include Native American historiography, Indians and empires, Indian removal treaties, resistance and accommodation to Euro-American encroachment and U.S. Indian policy.This reading course will survey Native American History from time immemorial to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on Native peoples as active agents in creating their own history both before and after Euro-American contact. Topics to be examined include Native American historiography, Indians and empires, Indian removal treaties, resistance and accommodation to Euro-American encroachment and U.S. Indian policy.

HIST 849-01 Readings in World History: Readings in World War I

This online course will cover the history of World War I from its root causes in the nineteenth century until the Paris Peace Conference, and beyond. During the term the major political, social, economic, cultural, and military aspects of the war will be explored in order to allow the student to understand how the Great War came to be such a significant event in the early twentieth century, and the ways in which it continued to cast a shadow long after the guns fell silent.

HIST 849-02 Readings in World History: Medieval Europe

This course surveys the broad sweep of the middle ages from late antiquity through the Fall of Rome, the Early, High and Late Middle Ages ending with the eve of the reformation in 1517. It covers broad political, social, economic and religious trends over this large period of time.

HIST 849-03 Readings in World History: Renaissance

HIST 849-04 Readings in World History: War and Society

HIST 849-05 Readings in World History: Imperial Russia

HIST 894 Introduction to Thesis

Prereq: HIST 801 and HIST 803 and admission to the MA History program

A required course for graduate students pursuing the thesis option. Prepares students to conduct primary research, construct historical arguments, identify historiographical patterns, and begin the writing process.

HIST 896 - Thesis

Independent study course directed by a history graduate faculty member for students who are approved to pursue the thesis option.

HIST 899 - Directed Readings - 1-3 hours

Independent readings on advanced history topics. Readings to be selected and directed by a history graduate faculty member. A 3 credit hour Directed Readings course is required for students pursuing the thesis option.