CBT Internships

"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." 

- Benjamin Franklin

Janice Woods • WSTC 119E • 308-865-8979 • woodsje@unk.edu
Brenda Jochum • WSTC 121E • 308-865-8122 • jochumb@unk.edu

STUDENT FORMS

Step 1 - Application for Internship
Step 2 - Internship Position Approval Form


Current Opportunities

Handshake

Learning In The Real World 

Theoretical knowledge is only half of your education at UNK. The other half is applying what you learn to the real world and learning from experience. Internships allow students to apply the knowledge and theory they learn in the classroom to the professional workplace. More and more, a question that pops up during job interviews is "do you have any relevant work experience?" Internships allow students to gain valuable work experience during college, while at the same time providing the opportunity to make connections in the professional fields they may be considering as career paths. Internships are among the many powerful ways in which a UNK education extends classroom learning into real-world experiences. In fact, most UNK students list at least one internship experience on their resumé by the time they graduate.

Where Students Find Internships

Business students intern at some of the best companies in the state and nation; education majors intern at schools across Nebraska; social work students intern at area hospitals and counseling centers; criminal justice students intern with law enforcement, corrections agencies, and law firms; advertising majors intern at leading agencies in Omaha, Chicago, and other places small and large… the list is nearly endless.

How To Find Internships

Many programs at UNK list internships as a requirement and have the connections, internship coordinators and other resources to help you find an internship. The Career Center also provides experienced counselors who may be able to help you plan your internship. While the summer of your junior year is the best time to gain work experience as an intern, we encourage you to visit the Career Center as early as your freshman year so that you get a head start on internship and career planning.

Benefits Of Doing An Internship 

Gain Valuable Work Experience. An internship provides the opportunity to gain hands on work experience that you just can’t get in the classroom.

Have an Edge in the Job Market. Employers are usually more concerned with your work experience than your qualifications, and internships are often the only way to get the work experience you need to secure a job. Many employers prefer or require applicants who have done an internship or relevant work experience.

Transition into a Job. Internships are the number one way for employers to find new staff in the US. Think of it as a really long interview, after which you’ve proved that you are a capable and hardworking employee.

Decide if this is the Right Career for You. If you’re not sure if this is the right career for you, doing an internship is a great way to try it out.

Networking Opportunities. An internship allows you to meet people who might help you land a job later on and give you the contacts in the industry you’re trying to break into. Plus, references from people in the industry will really add weight to your application.

Gain Confidence. After you’ve done an internship, if an interviewer asks if you know how to do something, you won’t say “um, yes, I think I would be able to do that” but can say “absolutely” and supplement your assertion with examples.

  

Starting an Internship Program

Follow the links to skip to desired section or scroll down for comprehensive review. 

Benefits - High Quality Program - Getting Started - Keys for Value - Tips for Success - Additional Information

Hiring interns benefits businesses as well. Student interns can increase productivity at a business by taking on projects, which frees up full-time employees to accomplish more creative tasks or those where expertise is required. College students also bring novel perspectives, fresh ideas, and specialized strengths and skill sets to the workplace. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, about 70% of interns pursuing full-time employment will return to the company of their internship upon graduation. Additionally, employers report a 40% higher retention rate among employees hired from their internship programs than those hired through other recruitment methods.

Each academic program in the College of Business & Technology at UNK meets rigorous standards of excellence required by leading national and international professional accrediting organizations. UNK business programs are among only 30% of business programs in the United States accredited by AACSB International. The Family Studies program is certified by the National Council on Family Relations, and the Interior Design program is 1 of only 7 across the nation accredited by both the Council for Interior Design and the National Kitchen and Bath Association.


10 BENEFITS of Starting an Internship Program

  1. Find future employees. An internship program is a year-round recruiting tool. Implementing an internship program means you have an ongoing pipeline of future fulltime employees. For many, the process of recruiting and hiring is a drain on company resources. One solution: Appeal to tomorrow's staff members when they're looking for internships, and all you have to do is choose the best of the bunch when it comes time to hire. Moreover, college campuses are viral societies. This means if your organization impresses one class of interns, word will quickly spread. Soon you'll find the most sought-after student talent is interested in working with you.
  2. Test-drive the talent. It's a human resources reality: A new employee makes a solid impression in the interview, but then just doesn't gel with your current team or your company's way of doing things. Because of this, hiring someone as an intern is the most effective way to evaluate their potential as a fulltime employee. When you "try out" candidates via a semester or summer internship, you make fewer mistakes when it comes to fulltime staffing; you avoid the pitfall of training a new hire, only to find out they're not a fit for your organization…or that the entry-level employee doesn't like the field. Starting an internship program lets you benefit from added manpower, while more accurately assessing candidates.
  3. Increase productivity. Speaking of additional manpower, setting up an internship program allows you to take advantage of short-term support. The extra sets of hands help your employees be more productive, prevent them from becoming overburdened by side projects, as well as free them up to accomplish more creative tasks or those where higher-level, strategic thinking or expertise is required.
  4. Increase employee-retention rate. The proof for the test-driving theory is in the positive employee-retention figures: According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers’ 2009 Experiential Education Survey, almost 40% of employers reported a higher five-year retention rate among employees they'd hired via their internship programs.
  5. Enhance perspective. It's not just the extra sets of hands that make interns advantageous. Especially in an organization of only 12 or 15 employees, new people bring with them novel perspectives, fresh ideas, and specialized strengths and skill sets. These augment the abilities of your professional workforce.
  6. Take advantage of low-cost labor. Interns are an inexpensive resource. Their salaries are significantly lower than staff employees, and you aren't obligated to pay unemployment or a severance package should you not hire them on fulltime. Moreover, while their wage requirements are modest, they're among the most highly motivated members of the workforce.
  7. Find free-of-charge. Working with your regional university allows you to advertise your internship completely free of charge. This means you get extensive exposure to the top candidates without putting a dent in your recruiting budget.
  8. Give back to the community. As a small business, you likely rely on community support. Creating an internship program is an excellent way to give back. Hiring interns not only helps students in your community get started; it enhances the local workforce as a whole.
  9. Support students. Internships provide students numerous perks: They gain experience, develop skills, make connections, strengthen their resumes, learn about a field, and assess their interest and abilities. Offering a paid internship is particularly beneficial, because it enables economically disadvantaged youth to participate. Students who have to help fund their own schooling will need a job, regardless. Providing an internship allows that job to facilitate a positive future.
  10. Benefit your small business. When looking for fulltime work, the top talent often go for big-name businesses. But when seeking internships, learning is the leading draw. Many candidates feel they'll get more hands-on training, real experience, and mentoring opportunities with smaller organizations.

Employer Takeaway
In terms of both today's workload and tomorrow's workforce, starting an internship program is an excellent way to facilitate success at your small- or medium-sized business.

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High Quality Internships

The internship may take place during the fall, spring, or summer semesters, and the purpose is to provide students with professional and applied learning experiences in the industry. Students will log work hours at your company while completing academic course requirements. Typically, students in favorable academic standing seek internships when they have one or two semesters of coursework remaining and have taken course prerequisites in their major subject area.

Many students and employers can be confused at the difference between an internship and a part-time job. An internship must include specific learning objectives. The student deliberately sets out to gain knowledge, skill, and/or further understanding of a particular industry. Unlike classroom learning, the student gains this not from lectures, reading, and exams, but from on-the-job experience. For this reason, internships are often referred to as “experiential learning”.

In general, there are two aspects necessary for an internship to constitute a high-quality learning experience:

  1. Diverse learning experience – The internship should be a diverse experience that compliments the student’s degree program. The position is within the student's area of study, and they bring to the internship the knowledge they've acquired through their education while gaining from exposure to several facets of the business.
  2. Mentoring – The internship supervisor provides guidance, evaluation, and feedback to facilitate the learning process while also challenging the student. The student and mentor engage in ongoing contemplation of learning objectives throughout the course of the internship.

The National Association of Colleges and Employers has defined internships as having seven essential criteria1:

  1. The experience must be an extension of the classroom: a learning experience that provides for applying the knowledge gained in the classroom. It must not be simply to advance the operations of the employer or be the work that a regular employee would routinely perform.
  2. The skills or knowledge learned must be transferable to other employment settings.
  3. The experience has a defined beginning and end and a job description with desired qualifications.
  4. There are clearly defined learning objectives/goals related to the professional goals of the student’s academic coursework.
  5. There is supervision by a professional with expertise and educational and/or professional background in the field of the experience.
  6. There is routine feedback by the experienced supervisor.
  7. There are resources, equipment, and facilities provided by the host employer that support learning objectives/goals.

So what does this mean for employers and site supervisors? Make sure the learning and mentoring components are primary when planning and managing your internship program.

Additional Responsibilities of the Employer 

Once the internship has begun, there are a few other activities required in order to meet the academic component of the internship experience.

Training Plan & Agreement

The student will work with business to develop a formal training plan (goals for experience). The student will bring the form to the work site with them, make a copy for your records, and then the student will submit the training plan to the Director of Business Internships.

Site Visit

It is the responsibility of the student intern to set up a time for the Director of Business Internships to visit the internship site about halfway through the internship. The Director will visit with the student and their direct supervisor together.

Supervisor Evaluation Form

Complete a final evaluation of the student intern. The student will bring the form to the work site with them and then will submit it to the Internship Program Director.

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Getting Started

→ Create a description of the internship by working with the UNK Director of Business Internships.

  • Include the areas where the intern will be training. Assign work activities pertinent to the professional development of the intern. Keep in mind that the internship should be mutually beneficial to both the business and the student. The intern needs a well-rounded experience exposing them to the many aspects of your industry, including some time shadowing various positions within the organization. Provide the student with at least one special project.
  • Include what type of student best fits the job profile (major/emphasis areas, coursework completed, skills).
  • Include the wage and/or any other support (i.e. housing). Internships with for-profit businesses and agencies are typically paid internships.
  • Include a start date, duration of the internship (12 weeks required), and suggested hours worked per week.
  • List how to apply for the internship and an application deadline.

→ Submit the internship description to UNK College of Business and Technology’s Director of Business Internships and Experiential Learning. The internship will be advertised to all students in the programs that fit the position. NOTE: We also recommend that you attend UNK’s career events in October and February (see UNK Academic & Career Services website for details and to register: http://careers.unk.edu).

→ Interested students will apply directly to the company, typically by submitting a resume and a cover letter.

→ Interview students. The interview is an important part of the internship experience for the student as they develop and polish the professional skills necessary for obtaining full-time employment. Follow up with the student and/or make offers in a timely manner, typically within two weeks of the interview. It may be an added benefit to the student if you choose to share a critique of their interview, resume, and cover letter.

→ Student should enroll in an internship course through UNK’s College of Business & Technology in order to receive academic credit for their experience.

→ Set a start date. Currently, internships may start and stop at any time during the year but must be for a minimum of 12 weeks.

Work Hours Requirement

Business Internships - Must be at least 12 weeks in length AND work hours required depends on academic credits enrolled.

  • 3 credit hours = 200 work hours
  • 6 credit hours = 300 work hours
  • 9 credit hours = 400 work hours
  • 12 credit hours = 480 work hours

Family Studies & Interior Design Internships No minimum weeks required AND must work 40 work hours per each 1 academic credit hour enrolled.

Recommended Hiring Procedures

We recommend that your company conduct the following prior to hiring an intern or full-time employee from UNK.

  • Background check
  • Drug test
  • Request and review university transcripts

We suggest that offers contain a statement such as “this offer is contingent upon the results of a background check, drug test, and transcript review.”

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Keys for a Valuable Internship Experience

Supervisor

Carefully select the intern's supervisor. Make sure this person is a professional member of your staff who is committed to and capable of developing people. Can this person commit time to administering the intern’s program? The supervisor should meet with the intern to discuss progress at least once each week. Consider providing the intern with a mentor in addition to their direct supervisor.

Timeline 

Develop a timeline of learning activities. This will help the supervisor and intern to have a plan to follow.

Introduction

Introduce the intern to members of your organization during their first day. Make sure others within your company recognize the valuable contribution they are making to the career development of a young professional. On behalf of UNK, please thank your employees for providing valuable experience and guidance.

Well-rounded

Provide a well-rounded experience that exposes the intern to the many aspects of your business and industry. Make sure the intern has been assigned work activities that are pertinent to their professional development, and also allow the intern to shadow various positions including their direct supervisor and positions that are inside and outside of their department. Minimize time spent working alone.

Projects

Develop a project with the intern which will contribute to their learning experiences as well as benefit the company. 

Exposure

Expose your company culture to the intern through company outings and inclusion in a variety of meetings.

Providing a Meaningful Learning Experience

One of the most detrimental employer errors, and one of the most common intern complaints, is assigning interns responsibilities that do not contribute to a meaningful, diverse learning experience. Some employers may utilize interns for primarily repetitive labor – making copies, running errands, filing papers, answering phones, and even cleaning offices – believing that assigning monotonous tasks maximizes their company’s investment by helping them accomplish work that no one else wants to do.

But in truth, assigning interns mostly menial work can have a number of negative effects on your organization:

  • It creates disgruntled interns. These interns give negative reports about your program to their peers. Once your internship program gets a reputation for only assigning unwanted work, you will struggle to entice the top student talent.
  • It undermines your ability to effectively assess intern skills. Knowing that an intern can organize your filing system doesn’t tell you much about their collaboration, problem-solving, or strategic-planning skills. Essentially, you’ve traded in the long-term benefit of evaluating the intern for full-time employment for short-term gains.
  • It cheats you out of the knowledge and insight the intern has to offer. Interns can be a source of novel solutions and new perspectives. You may be missing out on a mind that is full of fresh ideas.

Remember, the primary characteristic of an internship program is a focus on learning. Interns are looking for guidance, to gain skill, and to hone their education with hands-on work that will increase their understanding of the industry and prepare them for the workplace. So does this mean you can never ask an intern to create a filing system for you? Of course not. As long as the majority of work provides a more meaningful learning experience, assigning duties like phones, errands, and filing is completely acceptable.

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10 TIPS for a Successful Internship Program

  1. Survey your company, asking departments if they want interns, what skill sets, and how many interns they need. Some departments find interns useful and others find them a nuisance. Avoid creating ill feelings among departments that might feel slighted if they never get an intern to help out.
  2. Assign interns to areas that may need a full-time employee in the near future, using the internship to “test the waters” with candidates that you might hire. Be sure to ask employees in those areas for their evaluations on each intern’s performance.
  3. Consider rotating interns to cover areas left vacant as employees take summer vacations. Suggest that the departing employee give the intern an orientation on what to do to reduce the workload on the remaining staff. Although the intern may only be able to perform some of the duties, the department will appreciate the additional help.
  4. Appoint one junior employee to be in charge of interns as Intern Manager and point of contact and to mentor and monitor intern performance, freeing senior employees for more cost-effective assignments. The junior employee also increases the intern’s comfort level since the intern will enjoy working with a younger employee closer to his or her own age.
  5. Allow your Intern Manager ample time in his/her schedule to coordinate each intern’s schedule with the appropriate departmental manager. Arrange for the intern to spend a certain amount of time either daily or weekly with the Intern Manager to review progress. Establish a clear chain of command, ensuring that your employees know if they have any concerns about the departmental intern, they can get help from the Intern Manager.
  6. Prepare a description of internship duties and email it to the incoming intern for review, answering any questions ahead of time to prevent confusion. Make sure the intern has an Intern Packet with appropriate materials before the start date. The Intern Packet should contain company policy information as well as forms to track intern activity.
  7. Send a broadcast email to your employee distribution list that announces the intern, gives a sentence or two about him/her, and asks staff to extend a warm welcome. On the day that the intern starts, the Intern Manager should take the intern on a tour and introduce the new member to individual staff.
  8. Arrange for the Intern Manager to meet with the intern on Day #1 and discuss expectations and outcomes on both sides. Set the intern up to succeed by starting with small projects and graduating to more complicated and lengthy assignments.
  9. Ensure that the intern has a desk and proper supplies so he/she can begin productive work immediately. A more senior intern—if available—or the most junior staff member may want to have a short meeting with the new intern to talk about office procedures or to explain the computer system or any unfamiliar technology systems. Utilize current interns to train incoming interns, reducing staff time with interns and facilitating employees to fulfill work objectives.
  10. Reward an unpaid intern in other ways. If your company has a cafeteria, give the intern a pass that enables him/her to eat for free on working days. Take the intern to a professional meeting as your guest, paying for his/her lunch and introducing him to other professionals. Give a gift certificate at the end of the internship as well as write a letter of recommendation. Interns are your best source of future interns, and students share information about their experiences. Make sure everyone wants to intern at your company, so you have a wide selection of excellent applicants.

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Additional Information

Sources:
1. National Association of Colleges and Employers, 2011. Position statement on U.S. internships: a definition and criteria to assess opportunities and determine the implications for compensation. www.naceweb.org
2. Internships.com

Accounting

Students in the Accounting emphasis should seek out internships which provide opportunities to develop competencies in the following areas:

Tasks to reinforce or build on classroom instruction, including:

  • Completion of tax returns
  • Preparation of journal entries
  • Preparation of reports and schedules
  • Completion of audit procedures
  • Learning new software or accounting applications of software
  • Data analysis
  • Documentation of business processes and internal controls

Opportunities for professional growth, including:

  • Interaction with clients
  • Active participation as part of a team
  • Attendance at management meetings
  • Leading projects
  • Researching solutions to problems and/or problem solving

Course Requirements

Business internships can be completed during the fall, spring, or summer semesters. 

Prerequisites for the internship course

  • Check the course catalog.
  • You may need to have completed one or two introductory courses in your emphasis area depending on your major.
  • You also may need a 2.5 or higher overall GPA.

How to earn academic credit for your internship: 

  • Schedule an appointment to meet with Janice Woods, Director of Business Internships & Experiential Learning.
  • Bring a short job description of your proposed internship.
  • The internship course is PASS/FAIL; you will not receive a grade.
  • Obtain a permit to enroll in ACCT 475 from your department chair.

Business Internships must be at least 12 weeks in length AND work hours required depends on academic credits enrolled.

  • 3 credit hours = 200 work hours
  • 6 credit hours = 300 work hours
  • 9 credit hours = 400 work hours
  • 12 credit hours = 480 work hours

Additional responsibilities of the student: 

  • Journal – The student intern will post weekly entries in a journal on the internship course website. The journal entries will reflect on learning and application of knowledge. Other student interns and the Director of Business Internships can read and comment on the journal entries.
  • Reflection Paper – The student intern will submit a short paper to the course instructor which reflects on their experiences during the internship.

Haven’t found an internship but want to do one?

  • Fill out the Application then send it with your resume to Janice Woods, Director of Business Internships.
  • Schedule an appointment to discuss your interests and objectives with Janice Woods, Director of Business Internships & Experiential Learning.

Construction Management

A Construction Management internship is with a residential, commercial, civil or industrial construction company that demonstrates professionalism and provides experiences in the following areas.  Interns are to be exposed to management and leadership with no more than 20% of their time devoted to production/labor on the project site.

  • Management Principles
  • Cost Accounting and Analysis
  • Labor Resource Management
  • Organizational Behavior
  • Cost Estimating and Bidding
  • Project Planning, Scheduling, and Time Control
  • Project Organization and Supervision
  • Interpretation and Use of Construction Documents
  • Construction Safety
  • Construction Materials and Methods
  • Software Applications
  • Quality Control and Inspection
  • Construction Equipment
  • Written and Verbal Communication

Companies complete the Overview of Internship Experience (template on www.unk.edu/cm, select “Internships” from the menu on the right) defining how these components will be addressed during the internship experience.  Internships are approved by the CM Program and Internship Director based upon these components.  The Overview of Internship Experience should be provided to the intern at the time an offer is made, if not before as part of the hiring process.

Interns will work 12 full weeks and a minimum of 460 hours at one company that has an approved internship. 

In addition to hours of work, there are academic requirements reflective of a twelve credit hour course. 

IMPORTANT:  To receive credit for the course, the academic requirements must be met to the level of expectation defined in this manual and on Blackboard.  These are recorded in the Internship Benchmark (shared document on OneDrive).

~ Internship Prerequisites ~

1.   Industrial Technology major at UNK.
2.   Junior standing (58-88 hours completed).
3.   Complete at least 24 credit hours of UNK course work before internship.
4.   Overall GPA of at least 2.0 and a minimum of 2.5 in your degree program (Major Comprehensive Core GPA).
5.   Prior to the internship, complete ITEC 308 as well as required courses of your degree program (listed below)

          o Construction Management - ITEC 212, 250, 312, 370
          o
Industrial Distribution - ITEC 353
          o
Telecommunications Management - ITEC 330, 335, 345
6.   Attend required internship training sessions and complete required assignments.

Term of Internship

Summer Only. The entire 12 weeks of onsite work experience must be completed during the summer with one company.  Academic requirements are required in the Fall and Spring semesters preceding the Summer internship.

Students are strongly encouraged to complete their required internship prior to their last semester of school.  The best time to complete the academic internship is the final summer term of being enrolled at UNK (not two summers prior, even if junior standing).  We encourage summer experiences during summers prior to the academic internship.

Internship Procedure

Apply to the Internship Program (start of fall term)

1.   Submit Application for Internship with resume to the Internship Director. (due Sept. 15)
2.   Department checks prerequisites.
3.   Sign up for Internship Preview Consultation and attend.
4.   Submit resume revisions, if required.  (due Sept. 22)

Position Search   (mid-September – March 31 final deadline)

1.   Attend career fair prep meeting.
2.   Attend career fair.
3.   Complete and submit Career Fair Worksheet
4.   Interview with prospective internship employers.
5.   Send thank you notes & follow up with companies.
6.   Obtain Internship Overview from company (company uses our template – on website).
7.   Submit Position Approval Form w/ overview to Internship Director (BEFORE accepting position).
8.   Receive email from Internship Director on approval of position.
9.   Accept position.
10.   Complete Internship Agreement (due 1 week after accepting).
11.   Contact other companies that need to know you accepted a position.
12.   Complete Contact Information Form  as soon as supervisor is known.

Training Process – Sessions Required   (Fall and Spring Semesters prior to Summer internship)

  • Internship Preview Consultation
  • Career Fair Prep 
  • Career Fair attendance
  • Internship Decisions  (Late October or November)
  • Overcoming Pitfalls  (March) 
  • Internship Expectations  (end of April)

Internship Experience (Summer) 

12 full weeks, working full-time (with Memorial Day and Fourth of July off).  Interns work at least 460 hours during the 12 weeks, many will work more.  Interns may work longer, but on-site academic requirements must be fulfilled in the 12 week period. 

The summer timeframe is 15 weeks with the last day of finals being Thursday, May 3 and fall classes resuming on Monday, August 20.   Start/stop date options for Summer 2018 Internships are as follows:

Monday, May 7 - Friday, July 27
Monday, May 14 - Friday, August 3
Monday, May 21 - Friday, August 10


Business Internships

Click here to apply!

Here, you will learn about earning college credit for your internship, what to look for in an internship by major, and the necessary steps to obtain one. Follow the links to skip to the desired section or scroll down for a comprehensive review.

Course - Guidelines - Checklist


Internship Course

Business internships can be completed during the fall, spring, or summer semesters. 

Prerequisites for the internship course

  • Check the course catalog.
  • You may need to have completed one or two introductory courses in your emphasis area depending on your major.
  • You also may need a 2.5 or higher overall GPA.

How to earn academic credit for your internship: 

  • Schedule an appointment to meet with Janice Woods, Director of Business Internships & Experiential Learning.
  • Bring a short job description of your proposed internship.
  • The internship course is PASS/FAIL; you will not receive a grade.
  • Obtain a permit to enroll in one of the following internship courses from your department chair.
    • ACCT 475, ECON 475, FIN 475, MGT 475, MIS 475, MKT 475, SCM 476

Business Internships must be at least 12 weeks in length AND work hours required depends on academic credits enrolled.

  • 3 credit hours = 200 work hours
  • 6 credit hours = 300 work hours
  • 9 credit hours = 400 work hours
  • 12 credit hours = 480 work hours

Additional responsibilities of the student: 

  • Journal – The student intern will post weekly entries in a journal on the internship course website. The journal entries will reflect on learning and application of knowledge. Other student interns and the Director of Business Internships can read and comment on the journal entries.
  • Reflection Paper – The student intern will submit a short paper to the course instructor which reflects on their experiences during the internship.

Haven’t found an internship but want to do one?

  • Fill out the Application then send it with your resume to Janice Woods, Director of Business Internships.
  • Schedule an appointment to discuss your interests and objectives with Janice Woods, Director of Business Internships & Experiential Learning.

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Internship Experience Guidelines

Accounting - Finance - Management - Marketing - Supply Chain Management - Management Information Systems - International Business - Economics & Agribusiness

Accounting

Students in the Accounting emphasis should seek out internships which provide opportunities to develop competencies in the following areas:

Tasks to reinforce or build on classroom instruction, including:

  • Completion of tax returns
  • Preparation of journal entries
  • Preparation of reports and schedules
  • Completion of audit procedures
  • Learning new software or accounting applications of software
  • Data analysis
  • Documentation of business processes and internal controls

Opportunities for professional growth, including:

  • Interaction with clients
  • Active participation as part of a team
  • Attendance at management meetings
  • Leading projects
  • Researching solutions to problems and/or problem solving

Finance

Students in the Finance emphasis should seek out internships which provide opportunities to develop competencies in the following areas:

  • Investments
  • Real Estate
  • Insurance
  • Trust
  • Financial analysis
  • Wealth management
  • Banking operations
    • Credit analysis
    • Customer relations
    • Deposit/investment options and regulations
    • Loan origination
    • Loan documentation
    • Loan servicing
    • Marketing strategies
    • Teller operations

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Management

Students in the Management emphasis should seek out internships which provide opportunities to develop competencies in the following areas:

Individual Effectiveness

  • Communication – listen, write, and speak effectively.
  • Analytical/Research – assess a situation, seek multiple perspectives, and gather information as well as identify key issues and appropriate solutions.
  • Computer/Technical – demonstrate a basic understanding of software programs, especially word processing and spreadsheets.
  • Time Management – improve productivity by learning to manage multiple priorities/assignments.
  • Planning/Organizing – plan, organize, and implement projects.

Getting Work Done Through Others

  • Interpersonal Abilities – use a collaborative, problem-solving approach when working with co-workers and managing conflict.
  • Teamwork – recognize co-workers’ talents and work with them towards a common goal.
  • Leadership – take charge, motivate, and inspire others.

Marketing

Students in the Marketing emphasis should seek out internships which provide opportunities to develop competencies in the following areas:

  • Sales and merchandising
  • Market segmentation
  • Forecasting
  • Pricing
  • Product development/launches
  • Channel management
  • Market research activities
  • Buying or purchasing
  • Public relations activities
  • Customer service
  • Social media
  • Event planning
  • Advertising
    • Strategy or account planning or creative or media buying
    • Presentation or writing skills

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Supply Chain Management

Students in the Supply Chain Management emphasis should seek out internships which provide opportunities to develop competencies in the following areas:

  • Transportation and distribution planning
  • Product management
  • Procurement
  • Sales
  • Exposure to contract negotiation
  • Supplier, distributor, or vendor assessment
  • Production scheduling

Management Information Systems

Students in the Management Information Systems emphasis should seek out internships which provide opportunities to develop competencies in the following areas:

  • Must be directly related to the major of Management Information Systems
  • Must provide a meaningful and challenging hands-on work experience
  • Must provide interaction with clients and active participation as part of a team
  • Project leadership experience is preferred
  • Some representative examples are:
    • Research solutions to business-oriented problems using technology
    • Development of a project plan using the phases of the system analysis and design
    • Use of data analysis to support the decision-making process
    • Provide planning and training for a software implementation project
    • Use of appropriate software development tools

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International Business

Students in the International Business minor should seek internships which provide opportunities to develop appropriate competencies.

Students Will

  • Work in a multicultural, international business environment
  • Experience significant cross-cultural, business-related immersion, such as visiting and engaging with businesses abroad or in the multinational organizations within the United States
  • Experience international commerce, finance, trade, banking, supply chain, and other aspects of international business

Learning Objectives

  • Learn the processes involved with foreign currency financial transactions
  • Understand compliance procedures as they relate to imports and exports
  • Assess international suppliers, including compliance
  • Develop skills in identifying ‘knock-off’ products from abroad
  • Understand the global dimension of piracy of intellectual properties and trademark infringement
  • Research solutions to international business issues/problems
  • Become familiar with regulatory requirements in the global sector
  • Learn to communicate with international suppliers and/or clients
  • Plan transportation and distribution in the global supply chain
  • Work with international contracts
  • Learn documentation of processes and controls and preparing reports relating to exports and imports

Economics & Agribusiness

Students in the Economics or Agribusiness emphasis should seek out internships which provide opportunities to develop competencies in the following areas:

  • Must be directly related to the major of Economics or Agribusiness
  • Must provide a meaningful and challenging hands-on work experience
  • Must allow the intern to apply and enrich knowledge pertinent to economics and/or agribusiness

Agribusiness internships expose students to any of the following:

  • Agricultural price analysis and marketing
  • Farm, ranch, or agribusiness decision-making process with respect to production and financial resources

Economics internships expose students to any of the following:

  • Economic decision process
  • Money, banking, and finance
  • Economic analysis with respect to labor, environmental quality, health care, transportation, and other relevant economic issues

*The department strongly discourages internships at family-based businesses.

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Internship Checklist

 Submit Application for Internship + Resume to the Director of Business Internships. Click here for application. Make sure you have met the GPA and course prerequisites for the internship course in your major (see course catalog).

→ Find an internship in your area of study. Utilize your friends, family, neighbors, classmates, and professors to help you locate your perfect experience. Be open to relocation if necessary.

 Submit the Position Approval Form to the Director of Business Internships. Not every job qualifies as an internship, so don’t accept the job until you have it approved.

 Enroll in the internship course for your major. Request the enrollment permit from the Director of Business Internships, making sure to specify how many credit hours you want and which internship course. (Marketing internships greater than 3 credit hours require permission from the department.)

→ Log into Canvas when you receive the notification at the beginning of the semester of your internship. Access the syllabus and course policies to learn about the course requirements and assignments.

→ Complete your assignments by each deadline. When the required work hours have been logged and all assignments submitted, credit will be posted to your transcript.

→ Be the best intern you can be! Give as much to the internship as you can and get as much out of your internship as you can. Make sure you continue with the exceptional legacy of other UNK interns before you!

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Family Studies & Interior Design Internships

Click here to apply!

Here, you will learn about earning college credit for your internship, what to look for in an internship by major, and the necessary steps to obtain one. Follow the links to skip to the desired section or scroll down for a comprehensive review.

Course - Guidelines - Checklist


Internship Course

Family Studies & Interior Design Internships can be completed in the fall, spring, and summer semesters. 

Overview:

  • No minimum weeks required AND must work 40 work hours per each 1 academic credit hour enrolled
  • The internship course is PASS/FAIL; you will not receive a grade.
  • Obtain a permit and enroll in FSID 475. 

Haven’t found an internship but want to do one?

  • Fill out the Application then send it with your resume to Janice Woods.
  • Schedule an appointment to discuss your interests and objectives with Janice Woods, Director of Business Internships & Experiential Learning.

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Internship Experience Guidelines

Family Studies - Interior Design

Family Studies

Students majoring in Family Studies should seek out internships which provide opportunities to develop competencies in the following Family Life Education Content Areas as outlined by the National Council on Family Relations:

  • Families and Individuals in Societal Contexts
    • An understanding of families and their relationships to other institutions, such as the educational, governmental, religious, and occupational institutions in society.
  • Internal Dynamics of Families
    • An understanding of family strengths and weaknesses and how family members relate to each other.
  • Human Growth and Development across the Lifespan
    • An understanding of the developmental changes of individuals in families throughout the lifespan. Based on knowledge of physical, emotional, cognitive, social, moral, and personality aspects.
  • Human Sexuality
    • An understanding of the physiological, psychological, & social aspects of sexual development throughout the lifespan, so as to achieve healthy sexual adjustment.
  • Interpersonal Relationships
    • An understanding of the development and maintenance of interpersonal relationships.
  • Family Resource Management
    • An understanding of the decisions individuals and families make about developing and allocating resources including time, money, material assets, energy, friends, neighbors, and space, to meet their goals.
  • Parent Education and Guidance
    • An understanding of how parents teach, guide and influence children and adolescents as well as the changing nature, dynamics and needs of the parent/child relationship across the lifespan.
  • Family Law and Public Policy
    • An understanding of the legal issues, policies, and law influencing the well-being of families.
  • Professional Ethics and Practice
    • An understanding of the character and quality of human social conduct, and the ability to critically examine ethical questions and issues as they relate to professional practice.
  • Family Life Education Methodology
    • An understanding of the general philosophy and broad principles of family life education in conjunction with the ability to plan, implement, and evaluate such educational programs.

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Interior Design

Students majoring in Interior Design should seek out internships which provide opportunities to develop competencies in the following areas:

  • Global Perspective for Design
    • Exposure to contemporary issues affecting interior design
    • Exposure to a variety of business, organizational, and familial structures such as for-profit or non-profit businesses
    • Opportunities for developing knowledge of other cultures
  • Human Behavior
    • Appropriately apply universal design concepts or design environments to be useable by all people to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design
  • Design Process
    • Identify and define relevant aspects of a design problem (goals, objectives, performance criteria)
    • Gather, evaluate, and apply appropriate and necessary information and research findings to solve the problem (pre-design investigation)
    • Synthesize information and generate multiple concepts and/or multiple design responses to programmatic requirements
    • Demonstrate creative thinking and originality through presentation of a variety of ideas, approaches, and concepts
  • Collaboration
    • Engage in collaboration, consensus building, leadership, and team work
  • Communication
    • Express ideas clearly in oral and written communication
    • Use sketches as a design and communication tool; produce competent presentation drawings across a range of appropriate media
    • Integrate oral and visual material to present ideas clearly
  • Professionalism and Business Practice
    • Exposure to various market sectors and client types
    • Exposure to the role and value of legal recognition for the profession, professional organizations, life-long learning, and public and community service
  • Space and Form
    • Apply elements and principles of design to two- and three-dimensional design solutions, including board layout, models, and digital presentations.
  • Color, Furniture, Fixtures, Equipment, Finish Materials, Lighting, Acoustical Control
    • Appropriately select and apply color effectively
    • Select and apply appropriate materials and products on the basis of their properties and performance criteria, including ergonomics, environmental attributes, and life cycle cost
    • Lay out and specify furniture, fixtures, and equipment o Select and apply luminaires and light sources and appropriate strategies for acoustical control
  • Interior Construction and Building Systems
    • Read and interpret construction drawings and documents
    • Understand how design solutions are impacted by building systems
  • Regulations
    • Understand how laws, codes, standards, and guidelines impact the design of interior spaces

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Internship Checklist

 Submit Application for Internship + Resume to the Director of Business Internships. Click here for application. Make sure you have met the GPA and course prerequisites for the internship course in your major (see course catalog).

→ Find an internship in your area of study. Utilize your friends, family, neighbors, classmates, and professors to help you locate your perfect experience. Be open to relocation if necessary.

 Submit the Position Approval Form following the information at the bottom of the form. Not every job qualifies as an internship, so don’t accept the job until you have it approved.

 Enroll in FSID 475, the internship course. Request the enrollment permit from the Director of Business Internships, making sure to specify how many credit hours you want and which internship course. 

→ Log into Canvas when you receive the notification at the beginning of the semester of your internship. Access the syllabus and course policies to learn about the course requirements and assignments.

→ Complete your assignments by each deadline. When the required work hours have been logged and all assignments submitted, credit will be posted to your transcript.

→ Be the best intern you can be! Give as much to the internship as you can and get as much out of your internship as you can. Make sure you continue with the exceptional legacy of other UNK interns before you!

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Technology Internships

Providing industry experience through a required internship is an essential element of our degree programs. Please select the program of interest below for additional information. Each website includes internship information specific to the degree program, including company handbooks.

Serving the Programs of:

Brenda Jochum, Internship Director
Industrial Technology Department
308.865.8122 | jochumb@unk.edu